• DO YOU THINK
    YOU HAVE CHOSEN
    THE RIGHT PROTECTION?

    This section describes more about gloves induced allergic reactions and symptoms, the causes of allergies and the preventive measures that will guide you to the right protection.

    TYPES OF ALLERGIES

    REFERENCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    What Are The Categories Of Glove-Associated Skin Reactions?

    Irritant Contact Dermatitis Allergic Contact Dermatitis (Type IV [delayed] Hypersensitivity) Latex Allergy (Type I [immediate] Hypersensitivity or NRL* protein allergy)
    Causative Agents Toxic chemicals (e.g., biocides, detergents); excessive perspiration; irritating chemicals used in hand products and in glove manufacture Accelerators and other chemicals used in glove manufacture; sterilants and disinfectants (e.g. glutaraldehyde); bonding agents (e.g. methracrylates); local anesthetics Latex proteins from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree)
    Reactions Skin reactions usually confined to the area of contact Skin reactions usually confined to the area of contact Skin and systemic reactions can occur as soon as 2–3 minutes, or as long as several hours after skin or mucous membrane contact with the protein allergens
    Acute: Red, dry, itchy irritated areas Acute: Itchy, red rash, small blisters Acute: Hives, swelling, runny nose, nausea, abdominal cramps, dizziness, low blood pressure, bronchospasm, anaphylaxis (shock)
    Chronic: Dry, thickened skin, crusting, deep painful cracking, scabbing sores, peeling Chronic: Dry thickened skin, crusting, scabbing sores, vesicles, peeling (appears 4–96 hours after exposure) Chronic: As above, increased potential for extensive, more severe reaction
    Diagnosis By medical history, symptoms, and exclusion of Type IV and Type I hypersensitivity
    Not an allergic reaction
    By medical history, symptoms, and skin patch test By medical history, symptoms, and skin-prick or blood test



    Publications & Journals
    Back